Sitting too much
Walking

Which Hormone is Keeping you Fat? 

Are You Sitting Too Much?

 

Many of us sit for jobs or for school. And we sit in the car or on public transit. Then we come home and spend our leisure time sitting. It seems like it is hard to avoid sitting too much. But sitting too much has many health risks.

Here are some of the health risks of sitting too much

 

Increased risk of overweight and obesity

Within minutes of sitting, the electrical activity of your muscles drops causing your metabolism to slow down. This makes it more likely that you will gain weight or have trouble losing weight. Your blood sugar levels may also increase, which can also lead to weight gain.

 

Increased risk of type 2 diabetes

Insulin loses some of the ability to uptake glucose increasing your risk of type 2 diabetes.

 

LDL cholesterol levels increase

Higher levels of LDL cholesterol raise your risk of heart disease and strokes.

 

You lose muscle mass

When your muscles aren't used they start to shrink. This can lead to even lower metabolic rate and weight gain. And it can ultimately result in an early loss of independence as you start to lose the strength needed for everyday activities.

 

Your posture becomes worse

The muscles in your bottom (the gluteus maximus) lose strength while the hip flexor muscles become tight resulting in a hips tilted forward posture. At the same time, your upper body can develop a head tilted forward or rounded shoulder posture, especially if you work at a desk.

 

Decrease in bone density

Your bones respond to activity just like your muscles. Too much sitting means your bones will weaken which can lead to lower bone density and eventually osteoporosis.

Sitting is also bad for your spine. Sitting, especially with poor posture puts more stress on your spine than any other position.

 

Lowers your life expectancy

While too much sitting can increase the risk of obesity, too much sitting will cut as many years off your life as obesity or smoking.

 

Some things you can do

One of the biggest issues is prolonged periods of sitting, so the best thing you can do is to minimize those by taking breaks from sitting often. Even if you work at a sedentary job there are things you can do:

  • Take a break and stretch or walk around every half hour

  • Stand when you are talking on the phone

  • Use a standing or treadmill desk

  • Use active commuting such as bicycling or walking to work or to public transit

  • Use leisure time for getting some activity instead of watching TV

  • Make your life harder.Challenge yourself - Park further from the entrance when shopping, don't use drive throughs, and do dishes by hand (while standing of course)

  • Schedule structured exercise into your day.

I can help

If you are trying to lose weight and improve your health, it can be difficult to understand the different health recommendations. If you want help figuring it all out book a free call.

Reference:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiKg6JfS658

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/sitting/faq-20058005#:~:text=Research%20has%20linked%20sitting%20for,that%20make%20up%20metabolic%20syndrome.

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/the-dangers-of-sitting

Warm wishes,

Vicki Witt emoji logo white.png

Vicki Witt | Clinical Nutritionist | Holistic Coach | Reiki Master | Certified LEAP allergy therapist

Over 25 years of successfully helping you achieve optimal health and weight loss  | www.vickiwittweightloss.com

About Vicki:

Vicki Witt is a Clinical Nutritionist, Holistic Health Coach, and Reiki Master. She has been practicing over 25 years and specializes in holistically customizing diet and lifestyle plans to each individual for weight loss and hormonal control. Her clientele often report they feel the best they have ever felt and wish they had started sooner. One of the USA and Australia's top Nutritionists, she has won multiple awards for her services in the industry.

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Certified and Registered Nutritionist

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